Carbs and High Blood Pressure

Carbs and High Blood Pressure

worried-senior-man-high-blood-pressure-18166563This is something that I don’t even like to talk about because I have high blood pressure. Even though I control it now, because I had high blood pressure in the past, my doctor says that I have high blood pressure now. But she went on to say that I control my high blood pressure, now. I guess that’s true, but I won’t control my blood pressure with medication. I refuse to. I control mine with diet.

The last three times I saw the doctor, for the first time in my life that I can remember, my blood pressure was as perfect as you could get, 120/60. It was always something around 145/90, 168/95 or what it usually was at rest, 132/86. I can remember a nurse checking my blood pressure after waking up from spending a month in coma. My blood pressure at that time was 132/86. I thought that was normal. I didn’t learn until recently that it was actually, elevated. Even though it wasn’t considered that elevated at the time, it’s been recently learned that elevation even in this small amount, does enough damage to internal organs that it puts undue strain on the heart, to have to pump harder to get all the blood it needs to, to fuel your entire body.

damage-high-blood-pressure-hypertension-increases-risk-heart-attack-stroke-kidney-failure-52251425 “Wikipedia says about high blood pressure;

Hypertension usually does not cause symptoms initially, but sustained hypertension over time is a major risk factor for hypertensive heart disease, coronary artery disease,[2] strokeaortic aneurysmperipheral artery disease, and chronic kidney disease.”

I can tell you what it’s like to have a stroke. They’re no fun. I still live with the residual effects from the stroke that I had 31 years ago, hemiplegia (right side paralysis). I’m partially paralyzed today from a massive stroke that I had from a severe closed head injury, 31 years ago. I know very well what it’s like to suffer a massive stroke. To say the very least, they are life changing.

“Hypertension is classified as either primary (essential) hypertension or secondary hypertension. About 90–95% of cases are categorized as primary hypertension, defined as high blood pressure with no obvious underlying cause.[3] The remaining 5–10% of cases are categorized as secondary hypertension, defined as hypertension due to an identifiable cause, such as chronic kidney disease, narrowing of the aorta or kidney arteries, or an endocrine disorder such as excess aldosteronecortisol, or catecholamines.

What is defined here, in Wikipedia, as

“no obvious underlying cause” I define as Caused by Carbs.

I define them as caused by carbs because I know the value of restricting carbs in my diet and what that did to control blood my pressure. I attribute my first and continued experience with normal blood pressure to my diet that contains no starchy carbohydrates in it. Glucose, sugar, the food that kills, does so again by causing hypertension.

“Dietary and lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications, although treatment with medication is still often necessary in people for whom lifestyle changes are not enough or not effective. The treatment of moderately high arterial blood pressure (defined as >160/100 mmHg) with medications is associated with an improved life expectancy.[4] The benefits of treatment of blood pressure that is between 140/90 mmHg and 160/100 mmHg are less clear, with some reviews finding absence of a proven benefit[5] and others finding benefit.[6][7]

“Essential hypertension (also called primary hypertension or idiopathic hypertension) is the form of hypertension that by definition has no identifiable cause. It is the most common type of hypertension, affecting 95% of hypertensive patients,[1][2][3][4] it tends to be familial and is likely to be the consequence of an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Prevalence of essential hypertension increases with age, and individuals with relatively high blood pressure at younger ages are at increased risk for the subsequent development of hypertension. Hypertension can increase the risk of cerebralcardiac, and renal events.[5]

It’s interesting that the most common type of hypertension, tends to be familial and is likely to be the consequence of an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The most important of those genetic factors, happens to be diet. The one thing that never changes in a family’s diet that’s passed down from generation to generation, is the amount of carbohydrates in the diet. What’s changed over time,  is the carbohydrate itself. It’s become less nutritious. It’s become more dangerous because it creates more LDL particles in the blood, which in turn creates more plaque clogging the arteries, raising the blood pressure.

 “Hypertension is one of the most common complex disorders. The etiology of hypertension differs widely amongst individuals within a large population.[9] And by definition, essential hypertension has no identifiable cause. However, several risk factors have been identified.

The reason there is no “identifiable cause”, apparently is because nobody wants to consider, that the carbs that come in wheat and grains could be the cause, probably because they are just as addicted to them as everyone else is. I know for certain that the major contributing factor for essential hypertension is glucose. Anyone who’s on the diet that I’m on (keotgenic) can tell you the very same thing,

Carbs are the major contributing factor for hypertension.

Resistant hypertension is defined as the failure to reduce blood pressure to the appropriate level after taking a three-drug regimen.[7] Guidelines for treating resistant hypertension have been published in the UK, and US.[8]

“One possible mechanism involves a reduction in vascular compliance due to the stiffening of the arteries.

This is what interests me. If a reduction in vascular compliance due to stiffening of the arteries is a possible mechanism, we should look at what causes this reduction in vascular compliance. Since it’s due to stiffening of the arteries, we need to look at what stiffens the arteries, Atheromaor atheromatous plaque, a buildup of deposits within the wall of an artery

Veins do not develop atheromata, unless surgically moved to function as an artery, as in bypass surgery. The accumulation (swelling) is always in the tunica intima, between the endothelium lining and the smooth muscle tunica media (middle layer) of the artery wall. While the early stages, based on gross appearance, have traditionally been termed fatty streaks by pathologists, they are not composed of fat cells, i.e. adipose cells, but of accumulations of white blood cells, especially macrophages, that have taken up oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). After they accumulate large amounts of cytoplasmic membranes (with associated high cholesterol content) they are called foam cells. When foam cells die, their contents are released, which attracts more macrophages and creates an extracellular lipid core near the center to inner surface of each atherosclerotic plaque. Conversely, the outer, older portions of the plaque become more calcified, less metabolically active and more physically stiff over time.”

In short, it’s glycation of the LDL cholesterol that deposits foam cells in the tunica intima of the artery. That is what stiffens the artery and restricts blood flow increasing blood pressure. Understand what creates LDL particles in the body by reading The Value of Balancing Your Cholesterol or The Foundation of LDL Cholesterol. They explain exactly how carbs are the major influence of LDL cholesterol in the body. Reduce the LDL cholesterol and you’ll reduce the amount of plaque that flows through your system, which in turn will guard against stiffening your arteries and raising your blood pressure. Restrict the carbs and you’ll reduce the LDL cholesterol, limiting hypertension.

“Dietary and lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications, although treatment with medication is still often necessary in people for whom lifestyle changes are not enough or not effective. The treatment of moderately high arterial blood pressure (defined as >160/100 mmHg) with medications is associated with an improved life expectancy.[4] The benefits of treatment of blood pressure that is between 140/90 mmHg and 160/100 mmHg are less clear, with some reviews finding absence of a proven benefit[5] and others finding benefit.[6][7]

”Several environmental factors influence blood pressure. High salt intake raises the blood pressure in salt sensitive individuals; lack of exercise, obesity, stress,[9] and depression[25] can play a role in individual cases.”

Obesity can increase the risk of hypertension to fivefold as compared with normal weight, and up to two-thirds of hypertension cases can be attributed to excess weight.[17] More than 85% of cases occur in those with a Body mass index greater than 25.[17] A definitive link between obesity and hypertension has been found using animal and clinical studies; from these it has been realized that many mechanisms are potential causes of obesity-induced hypertension. These mechanisms include the activation of the sympathetic nervous system as well as the activation of the renin–angiotensin-aldosterone system.[18]

“Hypertension can also be caused by Insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia, which are components of syndrome X, or the metabolic syndromeInsulin is a polypeptide hormone secreted by cells in the islets of Langerhans, which are contained throughout the pancreas. Its main purpose is to regulate the levels of glucose in the body antagonistically with glucagon through negative feedback loops. Insulin also exhibits vasodilatory properties. In normotensive individuals, insulin may stimulate sympathetic activity without elevating mean arterial pressure. However, in more extreme conditions such as that of the metabolic syndrome, the increased sympathetic neural activity may over-ride the vasodilatory effects of insulin.

Recent studies claims that obesity is a risk factor for hypertension too-high-blood-pressure-14758663because of activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in adipose tissue,[22][23] and also linked renin-angiotensin system with insulin resistance, and claims that anyone can cause the other.[24]

“Dietary and lifestyle changes can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications” seems to be the underlying theme in diminishing high blood pressure. When talking about dietary changes, the issue here is weight, and the fact that most of us are carrying too much of it. We all know what influences weight more than anything else, carbs. This is the reasoning behind my conclusion that carbs are the major cause of high blood pressure. Again like the cause of cancer, if you remove any ingredient that it takes to make something, you cannot make that thing anymore and if we remove carbs from the equation of hypertension, it changes the equation completely. If you can curb the carbs, you can cure the disease,

“Much of the disease burden of high blood pressure is experienced by people who are not labeled as hypertensive.[66] Consequently, population strategies are required to reduce the consequences of high blood pressure and reduce the need for antihypertensive drug therapy. Lifestyle changes are recommended to lower blood pressure, before starting drug therapy. The 2004 British Hypertension Society guidelines[66] proposed the following lifestyle changes consistent with those outlined by the US National High BP Education Program in 2002[73] for the primary prevention of hypertension:

  • maintain normal body weight for adults (e.g. body mass index 20–25 kg/m2)
  • reduce dietary sodium intake to <100 mmol/ day (<6 g of sodium chloride or <2.4 g of sodium per day)
  • engage in regular aerobic physical activity such as brisk walking (≥30 min per day, most days of the week)
  • limit alcohol consumption to no more than 3 units/day in men and no more than 2 units/day in women
  • consume a diet rich in fruit and vegetables (e.g. at least five portions per day);

Effective lifestyle modification may lower blood pressure as much as an individual antihypertensive drug. Combinations of two or more lifestyle modifications can achieve even better results.[66]

The one thing they failed to mention above was carbohydrates. The first thing they mention is to maintain a normal body weight for adults. We all know that limiting carbohydrates is crucial to maintaining a normal body weight, hence, limiting carbohydrates are crucial to limiting hypertension. In my estimation, that means that carbs are a primary cause of hypertension.

“The first line of treatment for hypertension is lifestyle changes, including dietary changes,[82] physical exercise, and weight loss. These have all been shown to significantly reduce blood pressure in people with hypertension.[83] Their potential effectiveness is similar to and at times exceeds a single medication.[64] If hypertension is high enough to justify immediate use of medications, lifestyle changes are still recommended in conjunction with medication.”

Dietary changes when it comes to obesity, refer to weight loss, but here the recommendations refer only to limiting the use of salt. My contention is that salt isn’t that important if you limit the primary ingredient, and that’s the starchy carbs you get from all grain based foods, the foundation of LDL cholesterol.

Curb your carbs;
Reduce your LDL cholesterol,
Reduce your plaque,
Reduce your high blood pressure,
It’s Time For A Cure

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