Tag Archives: bladder cancer

Carbs and Cancer go together like love and marriage.

How Carbs Influence Cancer

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Cancer is responsible for over 8,200,000 deaths every year.

Cancer comes in so many different forms , it makes it very difficult to nail down any one solution for all the different types of cancer. However, playing a major influence in half of the different types of cancer, listed below, is one common thread that permeates our diets everywhere – glucose. It’s woven of three strands – wheat, sugar and grain based foods (flour and sugar). These basic staples that we were all encouraged to eat massive quantities of, is actually what’s killing us. The worst aspect of this whole problem is that we were told to eat them. We were told that they should be the largest portion of our meals and that we eat them on a daily basis. We were told to do this because, (we were told) that it was healthy for us. Why was the truth was never shared? I don’t know. But we do know now, just how dangerous this food staple really is. Cancer is like the carriage to the carbs’ horse. Carbs lead the way and the cancer follows.

I mentioned in Carbs! The Newly Discovered Death Sentence that this is not healthy food, and I intend to prove it, starting with  this page.

Because of the lack of studies done of the effects of wheat in the diet and cancer, it’s not always easy to piece the information together. Many of the studies that were done years ago have been suppressed from public knowledge and are not easy to obtain now. Dr Davis and Dr Perlmutter have already located many of these studies and they can be found in their books, Wheat Belly and Grain Brain. I spent only enough time to decipher sugar and wheat’s influence in half of the various types of cancer listed below. If the CPSC is considering warnings for chemicals that cause cancer, (which they are in California) why isn’t anyone considering warnings for the consumption of these food staples, sugar and flour?

Suffice it to say, there is enough evidence here to prove that this food source should come with the same warning that everything that causes cancer has to bear, like cigarettes, and now, processed meats and fast foods, and chemicals in California. (California’s attorney general, Bill Lockyer, filed suit in August against McDonald’s; Burger King; Frito-Lay, owned by PepsiCo; and six other food companies, saying that they should be forced to put labels on all fries and potato chips sold in California. The proposed warning might say something to this effect: “This product contains a chemical known to the state of California to cause cancer.”)

It’s interesting that California is going after fast food companies for the “cancer causing French fries” when it’s the bread that has as much if not more influence on cancer as trans-fats. I’ll admit, French fries play a definite role in cancer, but if they’d only look at the studies that show how sugar and wheat cause cancer, diabetes, HBP, cardio-vascular disease, digestive disorders, etc they’d soon have labels on everything that flour and sugar were used in. The full list is viewable on the page mentioned above.

This page is going to show how this food actually contributes to the environmental factors that are at the root cause of many cancers.

Cancer – There are over 100 different known cancers that affect humans.[2] causing 8.2 million deaths as of 2012 The great majority of cancers, some 90–95% of cases, are due to environmental factors. The remaining 5–10% are due to inherited genetics.[5] Environmental, as used by cancer researchers, means any cause that is not inherited genetically, such as lifestyle, economic and behavioral factors, and not merely pollution.[28] Common environmental factors that contribute to cancer death include tobacco (25–30%), diet and obesity (30–35%), infections (15–20%), radiation (both ionizing and non-ionizing, up to 10%), stress, lack of physical activity, and environmental pollutants.[5] Diet, physical inactivity, and obesity are related to up to 30–35% of cancer deaths.[5][39  The largest influence in obesity is wheat, sugar and grain based foods.

We’re only going to look at a few of the 100s of different kinds of cancer.
Of the 12 listed below, we’ll look at 6 of those in detail further below;
  1. Lung cancer – 1.56 million deaths annually, as of 2012
  2. Pancreatic cancer – 330,000 deaths globally
  3. Colorectal (colon) cancer – 610,000 deaths (Inflammatory bowel disease – 51,000 deaths in 2013 due to inflammatory bowel disease (largest influence to colorectal cancer) alone.)
  4. Breast cancer – 18.2% of all cancer deaths for men and women together or 283,920 deaths
  5. Liver cancer – In 2013, 300,000 deaths from liver cancer were due to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or alcohol
  6. Thyroid cancer – in 2010, 36,000 deaths globally up from 24,000 in 1990.[35]Obesity may be associated with a higher incidence of thyroid cancer, but this relationship remains the subject of much debate.[36] 
  7. Ovarian cancer – estimated 15,000 deaths in 2008
  8. Cervical cancer – 266,000 deaths
  9. Prostate Cancer – In 2010 it resulted in 256,000 deaths up from 156,000 deaths in 1990.[155]
  10. Bladder cancer – is the 9th leading cause of cancer with 430,000 new cases[3]
  11. Kidney cancer –17,870 deaths in the US and the UK alone in 2012, with 208,000 new cases each year
  12. Endometrial cancer – caused 76,000 deaths
Let’s take a closer look at some of these types of cancer;
  • Lung cancer – 1.56 million deaths annually, as of 2012, is the most common cause of cancer in the US. The most common cause of lung cancer is smoking which warnings are required on cigarette packs.
  • Breast cancergallery-thumbnails– 18.2% of all cancer deaths for men and women together or 283,920 deaths is the second most common cause of cancer related deaths in women. Risk factors for developing breast cancer include: female sex, obesity, lack of physical exercise, drinking alcohol, hormone replacement therapy during menopauseionizing radiation, early age at first menstruation, having children late or not at all, older age, and family history.[2][4 There is a relationship between diet and breast cancer, including an increased risk with a high fat diet,[44] alcohol intake,[45] and obesity,[46] related to higher cholesterol levels.[47] In breast adipose tissue, overexpression of leptin leads to increased cell proliferation and cancer.[69] Dietary iodine deficiency may also play a role. [48] Don’t forget what increases leptin levels in the system more than anything else. What would happen to breast cancer if you removed wheat, sugar and grains from the diet? Would that decrease the expression leptin and put a hamper of the spread of cancer? A high fat diet, in this case would be a diet that creates a lot of fat. Carbs create fat. Eating fat doesn’t. I’ve never seen a warning about obesity and breast cancer, or that eating grain based foods can cause obesity. There should be.
  • Prostate Cancer – In 2010 it resulted in 256,000 deaths up from 156,000 deaths in 1990.[155]  is the leading cause of cancer death in males worldwide.   The data on the relationship between diet and prostate cancer is poor.[87] In light of this the rate of prostate cancer is linked to the consumption of the Western diet.[87] There is little if any evidence to support an association between trans fat, saturated fat and carbohydrate intake and risk of prostate cancer.[87][88] Evidence regarding the role of omega-3 fatty acids in preventing prostate cancer does not suggest that they reduce the risk of prostate cancer, although additional research is needed.[87][89] Vitamin supplements appear to have no effect and some may increase the risk.[9][87] High calcium intake has been linked to advanced prostate cancer.[90] Consuming fish may lower prostate cancer deaths but does not appear to affect its occurrence.[91] Some evidence supports lower rates of prostate cancer with a vegetarian diet.[92] There is some tentative evidence for foods containing lycopene and selenium.[93] Diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, soy, beans and other legumes may be associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer, especially more advanced cancers.[94]  Men who get regular exercise may have a slightly lower risk, especially vigorous activity and the risk of advanced prostate cancer.[94]
  • Colorectal cancer – 610,000 deaths (Inflammatory bowel disease – 51,000 deaths in 2013 due to inflammatory bowel disease (largest influence to colorectal cancer) alone.) IBD is a complex disease which arises as a result of the interaction of environmental and genetic factors. It is increasingly thought that alterations to enteral (probiotics?) bacteria can contribute to inflammatory gut diseases[20][21]IBD affected individuals have been found to have 30-50 percent reduced biodiversity of commensalism bacteria such as a decrease in Firmicutes (namely lachnosperacieae and Bacteroidetes), what I believe are pro-biotics (but I can’t find a definitive answer to that). Further evidence of the role of gut flora in the cause of inflammatory bowel disease is that IBD affected individuals are more likely to have been prescribed antibiotics in the 2-5 year period before their diagnosis than unaffected individuals.[22]The enteral bacteria can be altered by environmental factors, such as Concentrated milk fats (a common ingredient of processed foods and confectionery) or oral medications such as antibiotics and oral iron preparations.[23] This tells me that those who are taking headache medication (NSAIDs) often, are themselves open for colorectal cancer and one thing we know about wheat and grain consumption is that it causes headaches, forcing one to use NSAIDs for pain relief.
  • Liver cancer – In 2013, 300,000 deaths from liver cancer were due to hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or alcohol. Liver cancer, also known as hepatic cancer, is a cancer that originates in the liver. Liver tumors are discovered on medical imaging equipment (often by accident) or present themselves symptomatically as an abdominal mass, abdominal painyellow skin, nausea or liver dysfunction. The leading cause of liver cancer is cirrhosis due to either hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or alcohol.[1] Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcoholhepatitis Bhepatitis C, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.[1][2] Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) is one of the causes of fatty liver, occurring when fat is deposited (steatosis) in the liver due to causes other than excessive alcohol use. NAFLD is related to insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome and may respond to treatments originally developed for other insulin-resistant states (e.g.diabetes mellitus type 2) such as weight loss, metformin, and thiazolidinediones.[4] We know that carbohydrate consumption in the form of wheat and grains cause insulin resistance. Doesn’t it make sense then, that the consumption of wheat and grains has a major influence in liver cancer?
  • Kidney cancer – Factors that increase the risk of kidney cancer include smoking, which can double the risk of the disease; regular use of NSAIDs such as ibuprofen and naproxen, which may increase the risk by 51%[9] or may not;[10] obesity; faulty genes; a family history of kidney cancer; having kidney disease that needs dialysis; being infected with hepatitis C; and previous treatment for testicular cancer or cervical cancer. There are also other possible risk factors such as kidney stones [11] and high blood pressure, which are being investigated.[12] 17,870 deaths in the US and the UK alone in 2012, with 208,000 new cases each year
  • Bladder cancer – is the 9th leading cause of cancer with 430,000 new cases[3] and 165,000 deaths occurring in 2012.[4]  Urothelial carcinoma is a prototypical example of a malignancy arising from environmental carcinogenic influences. By far the important cause is cigarette smoking, which contributes to approximately half of the disease burden. Chemical exposures such as those sustained by workers in the petroleum industry, the manufacture of paints and pigments (prototypically aniline dyes), and agrochemicals are known to predispose to urothelial cancer. Interestingly, risk is lowered by increased liquid consumption, presumably as a consequence of increased urine production and thus less “dwell time” on the urothelial surface. Conversely, risk is increased among long-haul truck drivers and others in whom long urine dwell-times are encountered. As with most epithelial cancers, physical irritation has been associated with increased risk of malignant transformation of the urothelium. Thus, urothelial carcinomas are more common in the context of chronic urinary stone disease, chronic catheterization (as in patients with paraplegia or multiple sclerosis), and chronic infections. Some particular examples are listed below:

The one factor that intrigues me the most is the influence of agrochemicals, in the disease. Some of the most treated foods in our diet are wheat, corn, soy and grain based foods. They genetically modify these foods to withstand the rigors of agrochemicals like herbicides and insecticides, both of which contribute to bladder cancer. What is the one food that we were all told to eat the most of? Grains. If this one food were taken out of the diet, would that affect the numbers of people dying from bladder cancer? I think so. (I’m sure Monsanto doesn’t think so.)

Risk factors for pancreatic adenocarcinoma include:[2][3][4][32]

  1. Age, gender, and race; the risk of developing pancreatic cancer increases with age. Most cases occur after age 65,[4] while cases before age 40 are uncommon. The disease is slightly more common in men than women, and in the United States is over 1.5 times more common in African Americans, though incidence in Africa is low.[4]
  2. Cigarette smoking is the best-established avoidable risk factor for pancreatic cancer, approximately doubling risk among long-term smokers, the risk increasing with the number of cigarettes smoked and the years of smoking. The risk declines slowly after smoking cessation, taking some 20 years to return to almost that of non-smokers.[33]
  3. Obesity; a BMI greater than 35 increases relative risk by about half.[3]
  4. Family history; 5–10% of pancreatic cancer cases have an inherited component, where people have a family history of pancreatic cancer.[2] The risk escalates greatly if more than one first-degree relative had the disease, and more modestly if they developed it before the age of 50.[6] Most of the genes involved have not been identified.[2][34] Hereditary pancreatitis gives a greatly increased lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer of 30–40% to the age of 70.[5] Screening for early pancreatic cancer may be offered to individuals with hereditary pancreatitis on a research basis.[35] Some people may choose to have their pancreas surgically removed to prevent cancer developing in the future.[5]
    1. Pancreatic cancer has been associated with the following other rare hereditary syndromes: Peutz–Jeghers syndrome due to mutations in the STK11 tumor suppressor gene (very rare, but a very strong risk factor); dysplastic nevus syndrome (or familial atypical multiple mole and melanoma syndrome, FAMMM-PC) due to mutations in the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene; autosomal recessiveataxia-telangiectasia and autosomal dominantly inherited mutations in the BRCA2gene and PALB2 gene; hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (Lynch syndrome); and familial adenomatous polyposis. Pan NETs have been associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and von Hippel Lindau syndromes.[2][5][6]
  5. Chronic pancreatitis appears to almost triple risk, and as with diabetes, new-onset pancreatitis may be a symptom of a tumor.[5] The risk of pancreatic cancer in individuals with familial pancreatitis is particularly high.[5][34]
  6. Diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and (as noted in the Signs and symptoms section) new-onset diabetes may also be an early sign of the disease. People who have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes for longer than ten years may have a 50% increased risk, as compared with non-diabetics.[5]
  7. Specific types of food (as distinct from obesity) have not been clearly shown to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer.[2] Dietary factors for which there is some evidence of slightly increased risk include processed meatred meat, and meat cooked at very high temperatures (e.g. by frying, broiling or barbecuing).[36][37]

Highlighted areas are all wheat and grain caused conditions that would not exist if this food weren’t in our diet.

If 90 – 95% of all cases of cancer are due to lifestyle and behavioral factors, what does that say about our eating habits? Our eating habits are the most influential factor in anyone’s lifestyle. The old adage, “you are what you eat”, is more valid here, than anywhere else.

Our individual diets are what separate us from each other more than almost anything else, as that’s what distinguishes us from each other. In every diet, there exists one common thread throughout the world, and that’s grains, wheat in the western hemisphere and rice in the eastern hemisphere. They’re in every diet of every ethnicity. This is the one common thread that affects everyone on the planet. It does so simply because it’s in every diet on the planet, in some fashion or another.

As evidenced above, there are 6 types of cancer on this page, alone, in which wheat and grains play a part. If you eat food that causes cancer and you’ll more than likely, contract cancer.

What if this one factor was removed from the equation of cancer? What if wheat and grains were removed from our diets? What would happen if you took out that one factor in the equation of cancer, out of the equation? Would you still come still come up with the same result?

I contend that it would change the whole equation enough that the end result of cancer would inevitably be changed. This begs the question, if we removed wheat and grains from the diet, would that be a start for a cure for cancer?

I understand why a warning label is on every pack of cigarettes, one should be, we know that smoking causes lung cancer. If they put out warnings for something that may cause cancer, like processed meats and ‘fast foods’, why can’t they put out a warning for something that clearly causes cancer, sugar and wheat based products?

Hopefully, the day will come soon.

Next, we’ll take a closer look at cardiovascular diseases and grains influence there.

A thousand thanks to Wikipedia, I would have never been able to compile this without their help. 85% of this page came directly from Wkikpedia.