Tag Archives: kilocalories

Is Your Diabetes Curable or Just Treatable?

Can Your Diabetes be Cured or Just Treated?

Diabetes can be the worst scourge to ever hit mankind. Its complications have magnified in the last 30 years or so and have set more souls up for shortened lives, than any other disorder, as this disorder is the gateway to future drug use and continued treatments, ultimately until death. The death is always premature. The grain industry and the pharmaceutical industry has made certain of this with a passion seldom matched by even our greatest artists, athletes and musicians, they are inflicting their will upon an unsuspecting public.

The desire of these industries to dominate our food supply and our pharmaceutical supply is ginormous. Their motivation has pushed them to force as many farmers as they can to grow their GMO seed, simply to sell more of their Roundup Herbicide. You know how dangerous that is by now. You should know that 1.3 million tons of it have been sprayed on your food or on feed for feedlots that goes directly into your meat. It’s this desire that has made carbs more glycemic today than they’ve ever been in history. This is what’s driving the diabetes pandemic today.              Get the book now!

The whole premise behind these posts is to prove that the only way you can prevent these horrendous diseases, is to stop the glycation that is responsible for them and the only way you can stop the glycation is to stop feeding it. It’s really a simple solution, just not an easy one because of the addiction factor. However, YOU and only YOU have control over this and it all depends on what YOU put in your mouth when you eat.

I’ll admit that that can be hard when you have a whole industry trying to get you to eat more of what it is that glycates. This is because they are connected to another industry that feeds off of the unsuspected that buy into this ruse, all those whom the glycation affects, the public.                                    Get the whole story!

With over 123,250 studies and reports available when I searched for diabetes and carbs on PubMed, it appears that this has been known for some time. There are studies on diabetes and carbohydrates dating from 1946. How could it have taken this long to put these pieces together?

The good news here is that there is a cure for diabetes. Thank you, Dr. Davis, for pointing it out for us. If you’re tired of treating your diabetes and poking yourself all the time, all one has to do to cure it or avoid it in the first place, is to not eat the food that is responsible for creating it and that is the starchy carbohydrates.

From PMC and PubMed,

Evidence of your carb intake and Diabetes

The only way out of this dilemma is to curb the carb usage completely. The following reports detail how carb ingestion leads directly to type2 diabetes, which ultimately leads to every modern disorder or disease;

The first one I looked at was from 1952; This study was so old, they still called glucose dextrose;

This was a difficult study to read and it only showed 8 diabetic patients. It didn’t mention which type they were either. It basically showed that an increase in carbohydrate consumption led to added glycogen and far stored in the body, clearly showing the link between carbs and fat. This study is older than I. Why have I not heard anything about it? Where were the warnings? Where they too afraid of upsetting an industry, so safeguard the public’s health?

This again is evidence that carbs and diabetes were being researched in 1945, as this report is from May 1945.

This is PubMed’s explanation of carbohydrates and how the glycemic index works. It helps to know how diabetics are thinking and how they need to keep track of the glucose levels in their blood.

  • Issues in Nutrition:Carbohydrates.

Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and dietary fibers. Resistant starches resemble fiber in their behavior in the intestinal tract, and may have positive effects on blood glucose levels and the gut microbiome. Fibers are classified as soluble and insoluble, but most fiber-containing foods contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber has been shown to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Many artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes are available. Most natural sources of sweeteners also are energy sources. Many artificial sweeteners contain no kilocalories in the amounts typically used. Sugar alcohols may have a laxative effect when consumed in large amounts. Glycemic index and glycemic load are measurements that help quantify serum glucose response after ingestion of particular foods. These measurements may be affected by the combination of foods consumed in a given meal, and the glycemic index may vary among individuals eating the same meal. Eating foods with a low glycemic index may help prevent development of type 2 diabetes. There is no definitive evidence to recommend low-carbohydrate diets over low-fat diets for long-term weight loss; they are equally effective.

They stop short of saying that if you don’t eat carbs you can avoid diabetes, so let me be the first to tell you, you don’t need to eat carbohydrates. Carbs, the way they’re grown today, makes them as dangerous as arsenic.

This article published online on Dec 10, 2016, disputes the importance large amounts of carbohydrates in the diet;

Carbohydrates are essential nutrients that are used as a primary source of energy. Carbohydrate utilization should be properly controlled, as abnormal regulation of carbohydrate metabolism is associated with diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. These metabolic syndromes have become a serious problem in developed countries, and there is an increased need for research examining the influence of carbohydrates on animal physiology. Diets enriched in glucose, a major carbohydrate, are also associated with accelerated aging in several model organisms, including yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Genetic factors that mediate the effects of high glucose diets on aging have been identified during the last decade, mostly through the use of C. elegans. In this review, we describe studies that determine the effects of carbohydrate-enriched diets on aging by focusing on the mechanisms through which evolutionarily conserved pathways mediate the lifespan-altering effects of glucose in C. elegans. These include the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1, sterol-regulatory element-binding protein, and AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. We also discuss the effects of various carbohydrates and carbohydrate-derived metabolites on aging in model organisms and cultured mammalian cells. Finally, we discuss how dietary carbohydrates influence health and aging in humans.

Would you consider this evidence that carbs should be, for the most part, limited to small portions…as small as possible.

  • Effect of type and amount of dietary carbohydrate on biomarkers of glucose homeostasis and C reactive protein in overweight or obese adults: results from the OmniCarb trial.

OBJECTIVE:

The glycemic index (GI) of dietary carbohydrate is thought to affect glucose homeostasis. Recently, the Effect of Amount and Type of Dietary Carbohydrates on Risk for Cardiovascular Heart Disease and Diabetes Study (OmniCarb) trial reported that a low-GI diet did not improve insulin sensitivity. We conducted this ancillary study of the OmniCarb trial to determine the effects of GI and carbohydrate content on glucose homeostasis and inflammation.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

OmniCarb was a randomized cross-over feeding study conducted in overweight or obese adults without diabetes (N=163). Participants were fed each of 4 diets for 5 weeks with 2-week washout periods. Weight was held constant. Diets were: high GI (GI≥65) with high carbohydrate (58% kcal), low GI (GI≤45) with low carbohydrate (40% kcal), low GI with high carbohydrate, and high GI with low carbohydrate. We measured glycated albumin (GA), fructosamine, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (CRP) at baseline and following each dietary period. These biomarkers were compared within-person between diets.

RESULTS:

The study population was 52% female and 50% black. Mean age was 53 (SD, 11) years; mean body mass index was 32 (SD 6) kg/m2. Reducing GI had no effect on GA or fructosamine, but increased fasting glucose in the setting of a high-carbohydrate diet (+2.2 mg/dL; p=0.02). Reducing carbohydrate content decreased GA in the setting of a high-GI diet (-0.2%; p=0.03) and decreased fructosamine in the setting of a low-GI diet (-4 µmol/L; p=0.003). Reducing carbohydrate while simultaneously increasing GI significantly reduced both GA (-0.2%; p=0.04) and fructosamine (-4 µmol/L; p=0.009). Neither reducing GI nor amount of carbohydrate affected insulin or CRP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reducing carbohydrate, regardless of high or low GI, decreased GA and fructosamine. This suggests that reducing carbohydrate content, rather than GI, is a better strategy for lowering glycemia in adults at risk for diabetes.

Would you consider this as evidence that carbs should be, for the most part, limited to small portions…as small as possible. Need I say more?

  • [Composition of macronutrients in the diabetic diet].

The diabetic diet is one of the pillars of diabetes treatment. The rapid development of knowledge relating to the treatment of diabetes also includes diet. The paper focuses on the importance of a diet in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and prevention of atherosclerosis. Its main goal is to assess the impact of a composition of macronutrients on individuals with type 2 diabetes. The paper is divided into several parts, each of which ends with a conclusion. The first part examines weight reduction. The diet aimed at a weight loss is effective, it can effectively prevent diabetes, it leads to improvements in glucose control and reduction of the risk factors for atherosclerosis, however it will not impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality until after more than 20 years. The second part deals with “healthy” foods. The studies exploring this area are not convincing. The only really rational component of food in relation to atherosclerosis is dietary fibres. Important is a balanced diet combined with regular physical activities. The third part focuses on the composition of macronutrients. It turns out that, considering a low-calorie diet, the effects of high- and low-carbohydrate diets on people with diabetes are similar with regard to weight loss and lowering of HbA1c, however the low-carbohydrate diet is associated with lower glycemic variability and a reduced need for anti-diabetic drugs. We do not know how the comparison of the two extreme diets would come out regarding individuals with a high energy diet. Currently it is useful to focus on the quality of individual macronutrients. Choose foods containing carbohydrates with a low glycemic index and high fibre foods, prefer fats that contain a low proportion of saturated fatty acids. The fourth part discusses the recent recommendation of the Czech Diabetes Society regarding the composition of macronutrients in the diabetic diet. As compared with the diet proposed earlier, lower intake of fibre-rich carbohydrates and higher intake of proteins and fats with a low content of saturated fatty acids is now recommended. Experts’ recommendations on this subject are included. Key words: atherosclerosis – diabetic diet – HbA1c – macronutrients – low-carbohydrate diet – obesity – dietary fibres – high-carbohydrate diet – health food.

  • Adverse effects on insulin secretion of replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrate but not with monounsaturated fat: A randomized controlled trial in centrally obese subjects.

BACKGROUND:

Current dietary guidelines recommend the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SAFAs) with carbohydrates or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) based on evidence on lipid profile alone, the chronic effects of the mentioned replacements on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are however unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the chronic effects of the substitution of refined carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in centrally obese subjects.

METHODS:

Using a crossover design, randomized controlled trial in abdominally overweight men and women, we compared the effects of substitution of 7% energy as carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA for a period of 6 weeks each. Fasting and postprandial blood samples in response to corresponding SAFA, carbohydrate, or MUFA-enriched meal-challenges were collected after 6 weeks on each diet treatment for the assessment of outcomes.

RESULTS:

As expected, postprandial non-esterified fatty acid suppression and elevation of C-peptide, insulin and glucose secretion were the greatest with high-carbohydrate (CARB) meal. Interestingly, CARB meal attenuated postprandial insulin secretion corrected for glucose response; however, the insulin sensitivity and disposition index were not affected. SAFA and MUFA had similar effects on all markers except for fasting glucose-dependent insulin tropic peptide concentrations, which increased after MUFA but not SAFA when compared with CARB.

CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, a 6-week lower-fat/higher-carbohydrate (increased by 7% refined carbohydrate) diet may have greater adverse effect on insulin secretion corrected for glucose compared with isocaloric higher-fat diets. In contrast, exchanging MUFA for SAFA at 7% energy had no appreciable adverse impact on insulin secretion.

Carboholics and Diabetics; This is your warning to steer clear of carbs if you want to control your diabetes. There is no literature that can definitively prove that you must eat carbs to survive.

Are these enough reports to prove how directly influence diabetes? After reading this can you see the logic in controlling your diabetes by controlling your carb intake? Where are the warnings from the FDA and the USDA? Don’t they care about what they’re recommending? Don’t they understand because of their recommendations, they’re sending millions of Moms and Dads, sisters and brothers, husbands and wives to their slow, expensive, painful deaths?

These are free reports that are available to everyone. All you have to do is search for them at the National Library of Medicine in the National Institute of Health. There are literally 100s of thousands of reports on the effects of glycation that remain hidden in the PubMed and PMC databases except to the few who look through them.  The only ones looking through this database are the drug companies looking for more ways to make money. Nobody is looking to warn anyone of the dangers of this food.

My question is why? The answer I get is, “there’s no money in it”. That’s is why I said in my first book, it would be a shame if profits and money weren’t the primary motivating factors in our society, but they are, and we have to live with it. That’s why I choose not to buy into it. It’s the same choice you have.