Tag Archives: wheat

The Glucose Ruse to Feed You Disease, Compliments of the Grain and Pharmaceutical Industries

The Glucose Ruse to Feed You Disease

This is a matter of your health being engineered without your knowledge or consent. The engineering in this case is not good. Actually it’s creating pain where none should exist. Our food supply industry may be the most important industry concerned, when it comes to our health. As everyone knows, ‘you are what you eat’, so it’s vital that what you eat won’t make you sick. Unfortunately, for those who still masturbate their taste buds with their addiction to sugar this couldn’t be further from the truth. Our food supply has been hijacked by the same industry that treats you for the illness their food supplies. Granted the health care industry is vital to our health, but I submit that it wouldn’t be as important as it is today, if we paid more attention to what we eat. Because I now watch what I eat, I can change the “we” to “you”, meaning “you” have to watch what you eat. (All that means is that you still have an addiction to break, I don’t, I broke mine three years ago.) Because of this addiction, you’ve doomed yourself unwittingly to a lifetime of medications. That is unless you’re one of the .05% who shows no ill effects from glycation. I have yet to meet one of them. If you eat at a restaurant or buy groceries at a grocery store, you’re subject to this addiction. It’s in their food everywhere you look. You actually look for it because you love to eat it. You love their advertising. What’s not to love, it’s full of attractive people selling you what appears to provide health, but in all reality provides nothing but the opposite, as it’s responsible for most all pain, most all disease, all brain damage, all atherosclerosis, all diseases affiliated with inflammation, and this is just for starters.

Monsanto has politically engineered their dominance of your food supply and subsequent health by forcing as many farmers as they can to use Monsanto’s seed companies’ GMO seed to grow their crops. Monsanto has many seed companies. Their control over the seed industry is mirrored by their control over the pharmaceutical industry because they can use the seed companies to influence the profits of their drug companies. , owns 15 crop seed companies all selling GMO seed for their contracted farmers to grow. Five of these companies sell seed for wheat crops. That’s the seed that grows the wheat that’s ground into flour for your bread and crackers. Their contracted farmers have to grow Monsanto’s GMO seed at risk of facing legal action, if caught growing anything else. This is how Monsanto controls what goes on your table to eat. This is also how Monsanto forces you into purchasing the Celebrex, made by GD Searle Pharmaceuticals. Searle has been part of Monsanto since 1985. The Celebrex is what your doctor prescribes for your arthritis that’s caused by the glycation set up from the grain diet you’ve been on all your life. After you get the arthritis that you will inevitably get from eating their GMO grains, you’ll be begging your doctor for that prescription for the Celebrex. Then you’ll get to deal with the side effects of the Celebrex that it inevitably has and presents to the body. That’s the damage to your body from the drug side of their industry.  The damage from the crop seed side includes crops that are not only GMO seed, they are laden with Roundup, the glyphosate herbicide that works by inhibiting enzymes from doing what they supposed to do by instructing cells how to operate. Even though Monsanto claims that these enzyme inhibitors affect only targeted enzymes, the rise in cancer alone, that the nation has seen since the mid to late 80’s, has told a completely different story. The rise in these disorders is directly caused by an increase in the glycation that occurs in the blood by the high glucose laden grains this company forces their farmers to grow. That means that the food going on your table is engineered to make you need the medications that the pharmaceutical side of Monsanto’s companies sell.

 According to Wikipedia; “In December, 1997 Monsanto merged with Pharmacia and Upjohn.[14] The agricultural division became a wholly owned subsidiary of the “new” Pharmacia; Monsanto’s medical research division, which included products such as Celebrex.[61]

GD Searle and Pharmacia are the other side of Monsanto’s multinational chemical companies,  that includes now,  Pfizer and Upjohn, as well. GD Searle was purchased by Monsanto in 1985 two years after Monsanto started dabbling in GMO crops.  In 1993 GD Searle file for a patent for Celebrex, its widely used arthritis drug. I’ll bet you didn’t know that it is Monsanto’s seed companies that force their contracted farmers to grow GMO seed designed to make you need their Celebrex. Is this what you thought you were buying when you bought those corn chips last time? Was this what you thought you were buying when you purchased those pretzels? Whether it was or not, that’s what you got. You also got all the rest of the damage that glycation does to the body, which includes cataracts, atherosclerosis, cancer and dementia as well. You’re also subjecting yourself to the hunger cycle, probably the worst manifestation of a carb diet. The more carbs you eat, the hungrier your get. That’s a cycle that can’t be broken if you don’t stop the fuel that feeds it. Stopping the fuel is the only way to stop the glycation. That means that it’s the only way to stop the inflammation, which means it’s the only way to stop the illness and disorder that glycation is responsible for.

This study done on glycative effects and Alzheimer’s disease was completed in 2005. Glycation of cholesterol into amyloid plaque was researched in this study. It showed that the plaque was responsible for Alzheimer’s disease. Where were the warnings then? It’s now 15 years later and millions of people have died from Alzheimer’s disease. The question I ask is why? Why weren’t we notified of this revelation 14 years ago? It’s been in the archives of PubMed since then. Why the delay? How many more must die before this news of the glycative effects of glucose, is released to the media to inform the public of this devastating news?

5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) attenuates the expression of LPS- and Aβ peptide-induced inflammatory mediators in astroglia

J Biol Chem. 1985 Sep 5;260(19):10629-36.

Glycation of amino groups in protein. Studies on the specificity of modification of RNase by glucose.

Watkins NGThorpe SRBaynes JW.

This study done on the effects of glucose on glycation was done in September 1985. Have you seen or heard of any part of this report prior to today? I haven’t. I had to search for it. The question I have is why wasn’t the public notified of this revelation? Were the research results suppressed so as to hide the truth from the public? I have to wonder.

About this same time, according to Wikipedia; In 1985, Monsanto acquired G. D. Searle & Company, a life sciences company focusing on pharmaceuticals, agriculture and animal health. In 1993, its Searle division filed a patent application for Celebrex,[42][43] which in 1998 became the first selective COX‑2 inhibitor to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).[44] Celebrex became a blockbuster drug and was often mentioned as a key reason for Pfizer‘s acquisition of Monsanto’s pharmaceutical business in 2002.[45]

What wasn’t disclosed publicly was the benefit that the stockholders retained when the merger was finalized. Stockholders of Pharmacia retained 23% of their control in the new Pfizer. You wouldn’t think that would have an influence in what they do to grow their customer base to sell more drugs, would you? Regardless of what you think, it does, and they do care. Monsanto sends this industry most of their customers just from the damage their food does to those who eat it. This industry has grown to accommodate those customers, mostly with their diabetes industry and ever expanding interests in dementia. Inflammation,  cancer and atherosclerosis, just for starters.

Was it coincidence? I have to wonder. Since then Monsanto has made moves to control all of the grain industry in America, by contracting farmers to grow no other seed than their own GMO seed. This forces the farmers who do this, to spray massive amounts of herbicide on those crops. The herbicide they spray is Monsanto’s Roundup, a glyphosate herbicide that works by inhibiting the actions of enzymes. Enzymes are important proteins in the body as they’re cell signaling proteins that instruct cells how to operate. This is important because it’s that instruction that the cells need to not become glycation. Otherwise, without that enzyme, you create inflammation. Inflammation is the foundation of all modern diseases. This is why grains are slowly killing those who eat them, cutting their lives short, to the tune of 2,684 deaths every day, that can be attributed to these killing field grains. These signaling cells are cells like hormones and cytokines that affect your body’s functions. If these aren’t working because of any enzyme inhibitor floating around in your blood, it’s going to lead to glycation and disease. This is the scary part of this story, if you eat bread, crackers, corn chips or anything flour is used in (whether it’s wheat flour or corn flour), your eating this herbicide along with your bread and cornpone.

Did you have any idea that this was being done to you without your consent or knowledge? I didn’t until I did this research. Did you have time to do your research? Why not? If you couldn’t, wouldn’t you think that we need some regulation in the field? The FDA and the USDA are supposed to provide that. With Monsanto’s control of each of those agencies, how much honest regulation do you think could take place? The regulation that does take place, takes place only for the benefit of Monsanto and Pfizer, not the consumer. We end up the lab rats in  this experiment. In my opinion, this is a failed experiment and should be shut down as soon as possible.

This study was complete in September 1985, about the same time Monsanto acquired G.D. Searle Pharmaceuticals. 8 years later they filed for a patent for Celebrex, their arthritis pain killer drug. Celebrex is a Cox 2 NSAID with the following side effects and concerns, according to Searle, and I’m listing all of them;

Contraindications

NSAIDs may be used with caution by people with the following conditions:[6]

Irritable bowel syndrome[6]

  • Persons who are over age 50, and who have a family history of GI (gastrointestinal) problems[6]
  • Persons who have had past GI problems from NSAID use[6]

NSAIDs should usually be avoided by people with the following conditions:[6]

Adverse effects

The widespread use of NSAIDs has meant that the adverse effects of these drugs have become increasingly common. Use of NSAIDs increases risk of having a range of gastrointestinal(GI) problems.[16] When NSAIDs are used for pain management after surgery they cause increased risk of kidney problems.[17]

An estimated 10–20% of NSAID patients experience dyspepsia. In the 1990s high doses of prescription NSAIDs were associated with serious upper gastrointestinal adverse events, including bleeding.[18] Over the past decade, deaths associated with gastric bleeding have declined.

NSAIDs, like all drugs, may interact with other medications. For example, concurrent use of NSAIDs and quinolones may increase the risk of quinolones’ adverse central nervous system effects, including seizure.[19][20]

There is argument over the benefits and risks of NSAIDs for treating chronic musculoskeletal pain. Each drug has a benefit-risk profile [21] and balancing the risk of no treatment with the competing potential risks of various therapies is the clinician’s responsibility.

Combinational risk

If a COX-2 inhibitor is taken, a traditional NSAID (prescription or over-the-counter) should not be taken at the same time.[22][not in citation given] In addition, people on daily aspirin therapy (e.g., for reducing cardiovascular risk) must be careful if they also use other NSAIDs, as these may inhibit the cardio protective effects of aspirin.

Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was shown to produce significantly fewer gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (ADRs) compared with naproxen.[23] This study, the VIGOR trial, raised the issue of the cardiovascular safety of the coxibs. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of myocardial infarctions was observed in patients on rofecoxib. Further data, from the APPROVe trial, showed a statistically significant relative risk of cardiovascular events of 1.97 versus placebo[24]—which caused a worldwide withdrawal of rofecoxib in October 2004.

Use of methotrexate together with NSAIDS in rheumatoid arthritis is safe, if adequate monitoring is done.[25]

Cardiovascular

NSAIDs aside from aspirin, both newer selective COX-2 inhibitors and traditional anti-inflammatories, increase the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke.[26][27] They are not recommended in those who have had a previous heart attack as they increase the risk of death and/or recurrent MI.[28]Evidence indicates that naproxen may be the least harmful out of these.[27][29]

NSAIDs aside from (low-dose) aspirin are associated with a doubled risk of heart failure in people without a history of cardiac disease.[29] In people with such a history, use of NSAIDs (aside from low-dose aspirin) was associated with a more than 10-fold increase in heart failure.[30] If this link is proven causal, researchers estimate that NSAIDs would be responsible for up to 20 percent of hospital admissions for congestive heart failure. In people with heart failure, NSAIDs increase mortality risk (hazard ratio) by approximately 1.2–1.3 for naproxen and ibuprofen, 1.7 for rofecoxib and celecoxib, and 2.1 for diclofenac.[31]

On 9 July 2015, the FDA toughened warnings of increased heart attack and stroke risk associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Aspirin is an NSAID but is not affected by the new warnings.[32]

Possible erectile dysfunction risk

A 2005 Finnish study linked long term (over 3 months) use of NSAIDs with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction.[33] This study was correlational only, and depended solely on self-reports (questionnaires).

A 2011 publication [34] in the Journal of Urology received widespread publicity.[35] According to this study, men who used NSAIDs regularly were at significantly increased risk of erectile dysfunction. A link between NSAID use and erectile dysfunction still existed after controlling for several conditions. However, the study was observational and not controlled, with low original participation rate, potential participation bias, and other uncontrolled factors. The authors warned against drawing any conclusion regarding cause.[36]

Gastrointestinal

The main adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with NSAID use relate to direct and indirect irritation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. NSAIDs cause a dual assault on the GI tract: the acidic molecules directly irritate the gastric mucosa, and inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 reduces the levels of protective prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis in the GI tract causes increased gastric acid secretion, diminished bicarbonate secretion, diminished mucus secretion and diminished trophic[clarification needed] effects on epithelial mucosa.

Common gastrointestinal ADRs include:[5]

Clinical NSAID ulcers are related to the systemic effects of NSAID administration. Such damage occurs irrespective of the route of administration of the NSAID (e.g., oral, rectal, or parenteral) and can occur even in patients with achlorhydria.[38]

Ulceration risk increases with therapy duration, and with higher doses. To minimise GI ADRs, it is prudent to use the lowest effective dose for the shortest period of time—a practice that studies show is often not followed. Recent studies show that over 50% of patients who take NSAIDs have sustained some mucosal damage to their small intestine.[39]

There are also some differences in the propensity of individual agents to cause gastrointestinal ADRs. Indomethacinketoprofen and piroxicam appear to have the highest prevalence of gastric ADRs, while ibuprofen (lower doses) and diclofenac appear to have lower rates.[5]

Certain NSAIDs, such as aspirin, have been marketed in enteric-coated formulations that manufacturers claim reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal ADRs. Similarly, some believe that rectal formulations may reduce gastrointestinal ADRs. However, consistent with the systemic mechanism of such ADRs, and in clinical practice, these formulations have not demonstrated a reduced risk of GI ulceration.[5]

Commonly, gastric (but not necessarily intestinal) adverse effects can be reduced through suppressing acid production, by concomitant use of a proton pump inhibitor, e.g., omeprazoleesomeprazole; or the prostaglandin analogue misoprostol. Misoprostol is itself associated with a high incidence of gastrointestinal ADRs (diarrhea). While these techniques may be effective, they are expensive for maintenance therapy.

Inflammatory bowel disease

NSAIDs should be used with caution in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis) due to their tendency to cause gastric bleeding and form ulceration in the gastric lining. Pain relievers such as paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) or drugs containing codeine (which slows down bowel activity) are safer medications for pain relief in IBD.[citation needed]

Renal

NSAIDs are also associated with a fairly high incidence of renal adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The mechanism of these renal ADRs is due to changes in renal haemodynamics (kidney blood flow), ordinarily mediated by prostaglandins, which are affected by NSAIDs. Prostaglandins normally cause vasodilation of the afferent arterioles of the glomeruli. This helps maintain normal glomerular perfusion and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), an indicator of renal function. This is particularly important in renal failure where the kidney is trying to maintain renal perfusion pressure by elevated angiotensin II levels. At these elevated levels, angiotensin II also constricts the afferent arteriole into the glomerulus in addition to the efferent arteriole it normally constricts. Prostaglandins serve to dilate the afferent arteriole; by blocking this prostaglandin-mediated effect, particularly in renal failure, NSAIDs cause unopposed constriction of the afferent arteriole and decreased RPF (renal perfusion pressure).

Common ADRs associated with altered renal function include:[5]

Salt (Sodium) and fluid retention

Hypertension(high blood pressure)

These agents may also cause renal impairment, especially in combination with other nephrotoxic agents. Renal failure is especially a risk if the patient is also concomitantly taking an ACE inhibitor (which removes angiotensin II’s vasoconstriction of the efferent arteriole) and a diuretic (which drops plasma volume, and thereby RPF)—the so-called “triple whammy” effect.[40]

In rarer instances NSAIDs may also cause more severe renal conditions:[5]

Interstitial nephritis

Nephrotic syndrome

Acute renal failure

Acute tubular necrosis

Renal papillary necrosis

NSAIDs in combination with excessive use of phenacetinand/or paracetamol (acetaminophen) may lead to analgesic nephropathy.[41]

Photosensitivity

Photosensitivity is a commonly overlooked adverse effect of many of the NSAIDs.[42] The 2-arylpropionic acids are the most likely to produce photosensitivity reactions, but other NSAIDs have also been implicated including piroxicamdiclofenac and benzydamine.

Benoxaprofen, since withdrawn due to its hepatotoxicity, was the most photoactive NSAID observed. The mechanism of photosensitivity, responsible for the high photoactivity of the 2-arylpropionic acids, is the ready decarboxylation of the carboxylic acid moiety. The specific absorbance characteristics of the different chromophoric 2-aryl substituents, affects the decarboxylation mechanism. While ibuprofen has weak absorption, it has been reported as a weak photosensitising agent.[citation needed]

During pregnancy

NSAIDs are not recommended during pregnancy, particularly during the third trimester. While NSAIDs as a class are not direct teratogens, they may cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus and renal ADRs in the fetus. Additionally, they are linked with premature birth[43] and miscarriage.[44][45] Aspirin, however, is used together with heparin in pregnant women with antiphospholipid antibodies.[46] Additionally, Indomethacin is used in pregnancy to treat polyhydramnios by reducing fetal urine production via inhibiting fetal renal blood flow.

In contrast, paracetamol (acetaminophen) is regarded as being safe and well-tolerated during pregnancy, but Leffers et al. released a study in 2010 indicating that there may be associated male infertility in the unborn.[47][48] Doses should be taken as prescribed, due to risk of hepatotoxicity with overdoses.[49]

In France, the country’s health agency contraindicates the use of NSAIDs, including aspirin, after the sixth month of pregnancy.[50]

Allergy/allergy-like hypersensitivity reactions

A variety of allergic or allergic-like NSAID hypersensitivity reactions follow the ingestion of NSAIDs. These hypersensitivity reactions differ from the other adverse reactions listed here which are toxicity reactions, i.e. unwanted reactions that result from the pharmacological action of a drug, are dose-related, and can occur in any treated individual; hypersensitivity reactions are idiosyncratic reactions to a drug.[51] Some NSAID hypersensitivity reactions are truly allergic in origin: 1) repetitive IgE-mediated urticarial skin eruptions, angioedema, and anaphylaxis following immediately to hours after ingesting one structural type of NSAID but not after ingesting structurally unrelated NSAIDs; and 2)Comparatively mild to moderately severe T cell-mediated delayed onset (usually more than 24 hour), skin reactions such as maculopapular rashfixed drug eruptionsphotosensitivity reactions, delayed urticaria, and contact dermatitis; or 3) far more severe and potentially life-threatening t-cell mediated delayed systemic reactions such as the DRESS syndromeacute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, the Stevens–Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Other NSAID hypersensitivity reactions are allergy-like symptoms but do not involve true allergic mechanisms; rather, they appear due to the ability of NSAIDs to alter the metabolism of arachidonic acid in favor of forming metabolites that promote allergic symptoms. Afflicted individuals may be abnormally sensitive to these provocative metabolites and/or overproduce them and typically are susceptible to a wide range of structurally dissimilar NSAIDs, particularly those that inhibit COX1. Symptoms, which develop immediately to hours after ingesting any of various NSAIDs that inhibit COX-1, are: 1)exacerbations of asthmatic and rhinitis (see aspirin-induced asthma) symptoms in individuals with a history of asthma or rhinitis and 2) exacerbation or first-time development of wheals and/or angioedema in individuals with or without a history of chronic urticarial lesions or angioedema.[15]

Contraindications

NSAIDs may be used with caution by people with the following conditions:[6]

Irritable bowel syndrome[6]

Persons who are over age 50, and who have a family history of GI (gastrointestinal) problems[6]

Persons who have had past GI problems from NSAID use[6]

NSAIDs should usually be avoided by people with the following conditions:[6]

Peptic ulceror stomach bleeding[6]

Uncontrolledhypertension[6]

Kidney disease[6]

People that suffer with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis)[6]

Pasttransient ischemic attack (excluding ibuprofen)[6]

Paststroke (excluding ibuprofen)[6]

Pastmyocardial infarction (excluding ibuprofen)[6]

Coronary artery disease(excluding ibuprofen)[6]

Undergoingcoronary artery bypass surgery[6]

Taking ibuprofen for heart[6]

Congestive heart failure(excluding low-dose ibuprofen)[12]

In third trimester of pregnancy[6]

Persons who have undergonegastric bypass surgery[13][14]

Persons who have a history of allergic or allergic-typeNSAID hypersensitivity reactions, e.g. aspirin-induced asthma[15]

Adverse effects

The widespread use of NSAIDs has meant that the adverse effects of these drugs have become increasingly common. Use of NSAIDs increases risk of having a range of gastrointestinal(GI) problems.[16] When NSAIDs are used for pain management after surgery they cause increased risk of kidney problems.[17]

An estimated 10–20% of NSAID patients experience dyspepsia. In the 1990s high doses of prescription NSAIDs were associated with serious upper gastrointestinal adverse events, including bleeding.[18] Over the past decade, deaths associated with gastric bleeding have declined.

NSAIDs, like all drugs, may interact with other medications. For example, concurrent use of NSAIDs and quinolones may increase the risk of quinolones’ adverse central nervous system effects, including seizure.[19][20]

There is argument over the benefits and risks of NSAIDs for treating chronic musculoskeletal pain. Each drug has a benefit-risk profile [21] and balancing the risk of no treatment with the competing potential risks of various therapies is the clinician’s responsibility.

Combinational risk

If a COX-2 inhibitor is taken, a traditional NSAID (prescription or over-the-counter) should not be taken at the same time.[22][not in citation given] In addition, people on daily aspirin therapy (e.g., for reducing cardiovascular risk) must be careful if they also use other NSAIDs, as these may inhibit the cardioprotective effects of aspirin.

Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was shown to produce significantly fewer gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (ADRs) compared with naproxen.[23] This study, the VIGOR trial, raised the issue of the cardiovascular safety of the coxibs. A statistically significant increase in the incidence of myocardial infarctions was observed in patients on rofecoxib. Further data, from the APPROVe trial, showed a statistically significant relative risk of cardiovascular events of 1.97 versus placebo[24]—which caused a worldwide withdrawal of rofecoxib in October 2004.

Use of methotrexate together with NSAIDS in rheumatoid arthritis is safe, if adequate monitoring is done.[25]

Cardiovascular

NSAIDs aside from aspirin, both newer selective COX-2 inhibitors and traditional anti-inflammatories, increase the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke.[26][27] They are not recommended in those who have had a previous heart attack as they increase the risk of death and/or recurrent MI.[28]Evidence indicates that naproxen may be the least harmful out of these.[27][29]

NSAIDs aside from (low-dose) aspirin are associated with a doubled risk of heart failure in people without a history of cardiac disease.[29] In people with such a history, use of NSAIDs (aside from low-dose aspirin) was associated with a more than 10-fold increase in heart failure.[30] If this link is proven causal, researchers estimate that NSAIDs would be responsible for up to 20 percent of hospital admissions for congestive heart failure. In people with heart failure, NSAIDs increase mortality risk (hazard ratio) by approximately 1.2–1.3 for naproxen and ibuprofen, 1.7 for rofecoxib and celecoxib, and 2.1 for diclofenac.[31]

On 9 July 2015, the FDA toughened warnings of increased heart attack and stroke risk associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Aspirin is an NSAID but is not affected by the new warnings.[32]

Possible erectile dysfunction risk

A 2005 Finnish study linked long term (over 3 months) use of NSAIDs with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction.[33] This study was correlational only, and depended solely on self-reports (questionnaires).

A 2011 publication[34] in the Journal of Urology received widespread publicity.[35] According to this study, men who used NSAIDs regularly were at significantly increased risk of erectile dysfunction. A link between NSAID use and erectile dysfunction still existed after controlling for several conditions. However, the study was observational and not controlled, with low original participation rate, potential participation bias, and other uncontrolled factors. The authors warned against drawing any conclusion regarding cause.[36]

Gastrointestinal

The main adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with NSAID use relate to direct and indirect irritation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. NSAIDs cause a dual assault on the GI tract: the acidic molecules directly irritate the gastric mucosa, and inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 reduces the levels of protective prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis in the GI tract causes increased gastric acid secretion, diminished bicarbonate secretion, diminished mucus secretion and diminished trophic[clarification needed] effects on epithelial mucosa.

Common gastrointestinal ADRs include:[5]

Nausea/vomiting

Dyspepsia

Gastric ulceration/bleeding[37]

Diarrhea

Clinical NSAID ulcers are related to the systemic effects of NSAID administration. Such damage occurs irrespective of the route of administration of the NSAID (e.g., oral, rectal, or parenteral) and can occur even in patients with achlorhydria.[38]

Ulceration risk increases with therapy duration, and with higher doses. To minimise GI ADRs, it is prudent to use the lowest effective dose for the shortest period of time—a practice that studies show is often not followed. Recent studies show that over 50% of patients who take NSAIDs have sustained some mucosal damage to their small intestine.[39]

There are also some differences in the propensity of individual agents to cause gastrointestinal ADRs. Indomethacinketoprofen and piroxicam appear to have the highest prevalence of gastric ADRs, while ibuprofen (lower doses) and diclofenac appear to have lower rates.[5]

Certain NSAIDs, such as aspirin, have been marketed in enteric-coated formulations that manufacturers claim reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal ADRs. Similarly, some believe that rectal formulations may reduce gastrointestinal ADRs. However, consistent with the systemic mechanism of such ADRs, and in clinical practice, these formulations have not demonstrated a reduced risk of GI ulceration.[5]

Commonly, gastric (but not necessarily intestinal) adverse effects can be reduced through suppressing acid production, by concomitant use of a proton pump inhibitor, e.g., omeprazoleesomeprazole; or the prostaglandin analogue misoprostol. Misoprostol is itself associated with a high incidence of gastrointestinal ADRs (diarrhea). While these techniques may be effective, they are expensive for maintenance therapy.

Inflammatory bowel disease

NSAIDs should be used with caution in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis) due to their tendency to cause gastric bleeding and form ulceration in the gastric lining. Pain relievers such as paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) or drugs containing codeine (which slows down bowel activity) are safer medications for pain relief in IBD.[citation needed]

Renal

NSAIDs are also associated with a fairly high incidence of renal adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The mechanism of these renal ADRs is due to changes in renal haemodynamics (kidney blood flow), ordinarily mediated by prostaglandins, which are affected by NSAIDs. Prostaglandins normally cause vasodilation of the afferent arterioles of the glomeruli. This helps maintain normal glomerular perfusion and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), an indicator of renal function. This is particularly important in renal failure where the kidney is trying to maintain renal perfusion pressure by elevated angiotensin II levels. At these elevated levels, angiotensin II also constricts the afferent arteriole into the glomerulus in addition to the efferent arteriole it normally constricts. Prostaglandins serve to dilate the afferent arteriole; by blocking this prostaglandin-mediated effect, particularly in renal failure, NSAIDs cause unopposed constriction of the afferent arteriole and decreased RPF (renal perfusion pressure).

Common ADRs associated with altered renal function include:[5]

Salt (Sodium) and fluid retention

Hypertension(high blood pressure)

These agents may also cause renal impairment, especially in combination with other nephrotoxic agents. Renal failure is especially a risk if the patient is also concomitantly taking an ACE inhibitor (which removes angiotensin II’s vasoconstriction of the efferent arteriole) and a diuretic (which drops plasma volume, and thereby RPF)—the so-called “triple whammy” effect.[40]

In rarer instances NSAIDs may also cause more severe renal conditions:[5]

Interstitial nephritis

Nephrotic syndrome

Acute renal failure

Acute tubular necrosis

Renal papillary necrosis

NSAIDs in combination with excessive use of phenacetinand/or paracetamol (acetaminophen) may lead to analgesic nephropathy.[41]

Photosensitivity]

Photosensitivity is a commonly overlooked adverse effect of many of the NSAIDs.[42] The 2-arylpropionic acids are the most likely to produce photosensitivity reactions, but other NSAIDs have also been implicated including piroxicamdiclofenac and benzydamine.

Benoxaprofen, since withdrawn due to its hepatotoxicity, was the most photoactive NSAID observed. The mechanism of photosensitivity, responsible for the high photoactivity of the 2-arylpropionic acids, is the ready decarboxylation of the carboxylic acid moiety. The specific absorbance characteristics of the different chromophoric 2-aryl substituents, affects the decarboxylation mechanism. While ibuprofen has weak absorption, it has been reported as a weak photosensitising agent.[citation needed]

During pregnancy

NSAIDs are not recommended during pregnancy, particularly during the third trimester. While NSAIDs as a class are not direct teratogens, they may cause premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus and renal ADRs in the fetus. Additionally, they are linked with premature birth[43] and miscarriage.[44][45] Aspirin, however, is used together with heparin in pregnant women with antiphospholipid antibodies.[46] Additionally, Indomethacin is used in pregnancy to treat polyhydramnios by reducing fetal urine production via inhibiting fetal renal blood flow.

In contrast, paracetamol (acetaminophen) is regarded as being safe and well-tolerated during pregnancy, but Leffers et al. released a study in 2010 indicating that there may be associated male infertility in the unborn.[47][48] Doses should be taken as prescribed, due to risk of hepatotoxicity with overdoses.[49]

In France, the country’s health agency contraindicates the use of NSAIDs, including aspirin, after the sixth month of pregnancy.[50]

Allergy/allergy-like hypersensitivity reactions

A variety of allergic or allergic-like NSAID hypersensitivity reactions follow the ingestion of NSAIDs. These hypersensitivity reactions differ from the other adverse reactions listed here which are toxicity reactions, i.e. unwanted reactions that result from the pharmacological action of a drug, are dose-related, and can occur in any treated individual; hypersensitivity reactions are idiosyncratic reactions to a drug.[51] Some NSAID hypersensitivity reactions are truly allergic in origin: 1) repetitive IgE-mediated urticarial skin eruptions, angioedema, and anaphylaxis following immediately to hours after ingesting one structural type of NSAID but not after ingesting structurally unrelated NSAIDs; and 2)Comparatively mild to moderately severe T cell-mediated delayed onset (usually more than 24 hour), skin reactions such as maculopapular rashfixed drug eruptionsphotosensitivity reactions, delayed urticaria, and contact dermatitis; or 3) far more severe and potentially life-threatening t-cell mediated delayed systemic reactions such as the DRESS syndromeacute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, the Stevens–Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Other NSAID hypersensitivity reactions are allergy-like symptoms but do not involve true allergic mechanisms; rather, they appear due to the ability of NSAIDs to alter the metabolism of arachidonic acid in favor of forming metabolites that promote allergic symptoms. Afflicted individuals may be abnormally sensitive to these provocative metabolites and/or overproduce them and typically are susceptible to a wide range of structurally dissimilar NSAIDs, particularly those that inhibit COX1. Symptoms, which develop immediately to hours after ingesting any of various NSAIDs that inhibit COX-1, are: 1)exacerbations of asthmatic and rhinitis (see aspirin-induced asthma) symptoms in individuals with a history of asthma or rhinitis and 2) exacerbation or first-time development of wheals and/or angioedema in individuals with or without a history of chronic urticarial lesions or angioedema.[15]

Other

Common adverse drug reactions (ADR), other than listed above, include: raised liver enzymesheadachedizziness.[5]Uncommon ADRs include: hyperkalaemia, confusion, bronchospasm, rash.[5] Rapid and severe swelling of the face and/or body. Ibuprofen may also rarely cause irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. NSAIDs are also implicated in some cases of Stevens–Johnson syndrome.

Most NSAIDs penetrate poorly into the central nervous system(CNS). However, the COX enzymes are expressed constitutively in some areas of the CNS, meaning that even limited penetration may cause adverse effects such as somnolence and dizziness.

In very rare cases, ibuprofen can cause aseptic meningitis.[52]

As with other drugs, allergies to NSAIDs might exist. While many allergies are specific to one NSAID, up to 1 in 5 people may have unpredictable cross-reactive allergic responses to other NSAIDs as well.[53]

Drug interactions

NSAIDs reduce renal blood flow and thereby decrease the efficacy of diuretics, and inhibit the elimination of lithium and methotrexate.[54]

NSAIDs cause hypocoagulability, which may be serious when combined with other drugs that also decrease blood clotting, such as warfarin.[54]

NSAIDs may aggravate hypertension (high blood pressure) and thereby antagonize the effect of antihypertensives,[54] such as ACE Inhibitors.[55]

NSAIDs may interfere and reduce efficiency of SSRIantidepressants.[56][57]

Various widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) enhance endocannabinoid signaling by blocking the anandamide-degrading membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH).[58]

How’s that for a warning label?  Did it have enough side effects for you? Think you might need more meds after taking this one? That label was 4094 words long. How many of those do you read? How do you know what you’re doing to your body if you don’t know what you’re putting into it? Do you think it coincidence that Monsanto started their GMO seed about the same time that glycation started being researched? Since much of this kind of research is funded by the industry it affects, I wouldn’t doubt that Monsanto had a hand in this research. This would allow them to immediately file these studies on glycation so that doctors and other scientists couldn’t find them to review. Yet each and every one of these 17,000+ studies have been vetted and examined by the NIH and PubMed. What I want to know is, why weren’t warnings about the glycative affects of glucose revealed at that time? Did Monsanto have anything to do with it?

The above list is the warning label for the adverse effects of Celebrex. Do you take Celebrex? Have you read the above warnings? Use of this drug can only lead to the use of more and more drugs. What do you think that would do for the profits for Monsanto? Do you still think this is coincidence? From renal failure, to the increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke,[26][27] this drug brings on more drug use, simply so people can get away from their pain, pain caused by consumption of Monsanto’s grains. To me this is completely an unsustainable cycle. It’s a cycle of death and disease, leaving only, people in pain. Where is the sense in keeping this addiction?

Celebrex isn’t the only drug that leads to this interdependent drug abuse orchestrated by Monsanto, Pfizer, Bayer and Syngenta. There is a profitable reason that this cycle continues. Boatloads of investors depend on it. Too bad they don’t know what it’s doing to the society that they have to life in and with.

I propose that we tell Monsanto how we feel about this, not with our voices, but with our mouths in what we eat. Quit eating grains. They’re responsible for nearly all the pain you experience (with the exception of physical injuries).Grains and the glycation they bring, bring also all inflammation that influences all diseases. Stop buying bread, crackers, cookies, anything that flour is used in, stop using it, forever. That’s the only way you can start to free yourself from the addiction. You have to stop buying their junk food. Their junk food is making you sick. It’s making you sicker by the day. Stop it, you have the power to stop it and by stopping it, it gives you power, far more power than what you ever could have imagined you would have.

According to the BJM (British Medical Journal) on Cox 2 inhibitors such as Celebrex,  Selective COX 2 inhibitors are associated with a moderate increase in the risk of vascular events, as are high dose regimens of ibuprofen and diclofenac, but high dose naproxen is not associated with such an excess. How often do you need to take an Advil for your headache? Were you aware of what that painkiller does to your kidneys and liver or how much it increased your odds of having a heart attack? Why weren’t you made aware of that when it was sold to you? Maybe it was. Every drug commercial is primarily a dissertation of the adverse effects and precautions and contraindications each drug has. They all have to include this in all advertising. You’d think that that would dissuade anyone from buying into what has turned out to be nothing more than a perception of health. What drug use leads to is really not relief but continued drug use. It’s called ongoing treatment. Every hospital takes part in it. This is the effect of a society on carbohydrates….a society on drugs.

In all, there were 11,833 studies on PubMed, on the effects of glucose glycating proteins, hemoglobin, and cholesterol dating back to March, 1984. {There were 17628 studies done on PMC.) Incidentally, that was one month after I was released from the hospital after spending a month in a coma and suffering two strokes while comatose. I could have never come back this far without Dr Perlmutter’s help and advice that it was the AGEs that were hindering my recovery. Again, I have to thank you, Dr Perlmutter.

With having the evidence for over 30 years, why hasn’t the public been told about glycation or the AGEs they create prior to Dr Perlmutter’s book, Grain Brain? It’s those AGEs that are at the root of all modern diseases. If this was uncovered 30+ years ago, why have we just found out about it from the bestselling books from two doctors? Was someone trying to hide something? My guess is yes.

This is Monsanto’s path to power and freedom. Their freedom is to wreak whatever havoc they can on your health by masturbating your taste buds with their glucose laden products, so you’ll be buying their pharmaceuticals in the near future. By near, I mean, it only takes a couple days before you’re indebted (addicted). If you want true power and freedom, you can have it in two weeks. That’s how long it takes to break the addiction. Or you can do it with a fast in 3 days.

Weight Loss – Thoughts From My Own Journey In Abstaining From Wheat

Weight Loss –

Thoughts From My Own Journey In Abstaining From Wheat

Eight years and 60 lbs ago, I decided after looking at my drivers license picture, that I had to make some changes in the form of weight loss or  I was going to die much sooner than I had planned to. I knew that I had to get back to where I used to be, twenty years ago when I weighed 155lbs. It seems that all of a sudden, I turned into a very “cheeky fellow”. I mean that my cheeks looked like they belonged to chipmunks. Problem was, they had nothing in them…except fat. I had become very comfortable eating every kind of pastry, pasta and bread that I could find, thinking that it was all healthy for me and wasn’t affecting my weight in the slightest. Boy was I wrong!

 : man sees possibilities in mirror Stock Photo

Fortunately for me, a farmer’s market opened up by me, that carried a lot of bulk foods. This allowed me to cut down or even stop eating processed foods and concentrate more on preparing everything for myself. I soon learned the best way to lose weight for me was to limit my intake of breads (which I love) and grain based snack foods and eat more fruits and vegetables, not only for meals but for snacks between meals.

I’m one of those that believes that fruits and vegetables should be at the bottom of the old food pyramid that I followed growing up. instead of grains because it’s the fruits and vegetables that are really the most nutritious. Now don’t get me wrong. I didn’t say to stop eating breads, I’m just saying that you should limit your intake. But I am saying that you should stop eating all snacks made out of grains, especially wheat.

For me, the ratio was directly proportional, the more fruit and vegetables I ate, the more weight I lost. The more breads and snacks I ate, the more weight I gained. For me it was easy, just cut out all the breads and snacks and eat only fruits and vegetables.

That worked until I became anemic and had to start taking B-12 tablets. That was when I decided to put meat back into my diet and with meat came the grains in the form of breads, pastas, and cereals. After the meat and grains came the weight. I say this to point out the fact that balance is what’s most important, for when I became anemic, I was 10 lbs under my optimal weight after losing close to 50 lbs. I lost it by eating nothing but fruits and vegetables and in doing that I lost the balance. I may have lost some weight but I lost some of my health also.

Now I make sure that I have more meat in my diet by having at least one serving each day and I try to control the amount of breads, pastas and cereals so I can maintain a weight that’s optimal for me. But then, even though exercise has always been a part of my daily routine, it’s the food side of the equation that I’m dwelling on with this  post.

Balance is the optimal expression here. We  just need to make sure that our balance should tip to the fruit and vegetable side of the plate. Changing snack food to fruits and nuts instead of grain products like pastries and cookies might be the most important change that I’ve made. Although I haven’t tried the Fat Burning Brownies  or the Guilt Free Chocolate yet, I still have a yen to do so. I’ll keep you posted on the success they have with my weight loss program.

Although I haven’t tried the Fat Burning Brownies or the Guilt Free Chocolate yet, I’m almost sorry to say that I never will as I have learned that there’s something to the claim that Dr William Davis made in his book Wheat Belly, because I’ve broke my addiction to breads and pastas and I’ve dropped another 5 lbs. Best thing yet? It’s still off after 1 month, so I would highly recommend that you read Wheat Belly by Dr William Davis. It’s an eye opening book in which Dr Davis claims that wheat should be called “Frankenwheat” due to it addictive nature as well as the lack of nutrition that it now has due to genetic engineering, simply to get more crop out of an acre of ground. I said goodbye to wheat. You should try if you think you can? Because of it’s addictive nature, I can guarantee you that it’ll be tougher than you think, but the rewards for doing so far outweigh the consequences of not doing so.

After trying to eliminate all wheat from my diet, I was able to eliminate 98% of it. Not until trying to eliminate it all did I ever realized how prevalent it is in our daily diet. It’s no wonder we’re so overweight. Wheat products are everywhere you turn in the grocery store. Every Restaurant serves some form of it. It’s the next thing closest to impossible to get away from. But since trying to do exactly that 1 month ago, I’ve lost another 5 lbs. to where I’m only 5 lbs away from my optimum weight for my height, with my BMI being 1/10th of a point from being excellent (20.1) for my age. I had an idea that it was the breads that wasn’t letting me get past the point I was at, but I had little idea how much they were hindering me. Since I’ve all but stopped them completely, my moods have stabilized and I’m not so quick to anger, probably because my blood sugars are staying on a more even level. I’ve replaced the breads with more nutritious foods (fruits and vegetables) which have far more micro-nutrients in them than what the bread has. This one little change has perhaps had more influence on my life and interaction with people than almost anything else. Breads weren’t just hurting my body, but the were hurting my brain as well.

I’m doing my best to stay off the grain products and it’s going good except for a few crackers once in a while. If I’m not careful though, my old addiction will kick in and I’ll end up gorging out on not just crackers, but any or all grain products like pastries, pasta, and bread as swell as the worst of them all, cookies and donuts. There’s so many of them out there and there so easy to consume, it’s like it’s a conspiracy to keep me eating that which is least healthiest for me. I almost feel like a rebel trying to break away from this crap but this is something I feel good about rebelling against. After falling back to my old addiction and increasing my bread intake, I managed to put on 5 lbs. but fortunately, taking it back off was as easy as stopping the grain intake, because it came right back off within a week after I cut back. Since then, I’ve stayed off of it, and managed to lose another 3 lbs. I’m now within 2 lbs of my target weight. This was a weight I never thought I could achieve and I’m only 2 lbs away bringing me to this conclusion, grain products offer too little nourishment for the amount of weight gain they bring. They’re too heavy on the simple starches that add weight and too light on the complex carbohydrates that have the micro-nutrients that give me the nutrition I need. This throws the balance too far away from healthy for me.

It’s been about 3 months since I decided to quit eating bread products, for all intents and purposes. But it’s impossible to do away with altogether. I see now how this could be the biggest crisis to America, since the Cold War, the assumption that bread products of all kinds are somehow good for us. Since I cut back on my intake of bread three months ago, I’ve lost another 12 lbs and am now below my ideal weight by 2 lbs. The beauty of it is, I know my weight is going to stay here as long as I control the amount of bread products that I put in my mouth to eat. The fewer grain products I eat the easier it is to lose weight. If I want to maintain my weight I include a little bit of them in my diet. If I want to lose weight I eat less grains (breads, cakes, pastries, danish, pasta, noodles, rice & rice dishes, cereal, granola, popcorn, etc). I have to admit that going without eating all of the products listed is the next thing closest to impossible, but if I control the intake of those products, I control my weight.

This is to the point where it’s almost unbelievable except for the fact that I’m living it. And experiencing it! 4 Months and counting, with reduced grains and no wheat.  An additional 18 lbs and holding. My weight is at a 27 year low. The last time it was this low, I was recovering from being in a coma for a month. This weight loss that I’ve experienced just from cutting back on grains and eliminating wheat and anything that contains any portion of wheat, has manifested multiple other blessings on my body, brain and behavior. One of the biggest blessings is I’m not hungry all of the time. It’s becoming almost too easy to ignore my stomach, which is something I’ve never been able to do. That’s alright because now I can eat more than I ever used to eat and I still lose weight.  Although I may be to my ideal weight now, as my weight has stayed the same for about a week.  The benefits though don’t stop with my reduced weight. They go much farther than that. I don’t feel the pain of arthritis as much, my stomach doesn’t act up as much, my thinking is much, much clearer. That’s probably due to the more stable glucose levels in my blood. This book, Wheat Belly, has truly changed my life. If you were smart, you’d let it change yours too.

In my continuing chronicle of my abstinence from wheat, it’s been about 4 1/2 months, my weight has hit a 28 year low and I’ve been accused of turning skinny. It may be time to reintroduce wheat back into my diet and I would except for the few times that I’ve tried it already. When I did add wheat back into my diet, problems started to arise that essentially reminded me of why it was such a good idea to quit, such as my joints would start hurting again, I’d start itching usually about 5-10 minutes after I ingested the bread or cracker. So now that I’ve found out that I indeed to have an intolerance to wheat, I’m in the search for products of this nature that won’t contain any wheat within them. This is a challenge that I didn’t expect to run into, finding breads and crackers that don’t have any wheat flour contained within them. I know enough to look for gluten free products but half of the problem is that the fillers they use for the gluten are more fattening than the gluten itself. But it’s not just the gluten that bothers me, it the gliadin, the part responsible for aggravating  any arthritis you might have in your body as well as damaging your brain cells beyond repair. It turns out then, that it seems to be a really good idea to give up the wheat products for more reasons than just the weight loss. By quitting the wheat, I’m saving my brain as well as my body. I would have never guessed that in a million years, that such a simple product as bread or pasta, could cause so much problems in our bodies or our brains. My next read is to learn more precisely what grains in general are doing to our brains by reading Grain Brain by Dr Perlmutter.

I’m now about 6 months into my new life without wheat or now, without any grains. After reading Grain Brain, all carbohydrates have been reduced with the exception of green vegetables and fruits in limited amounts. My weight is hovering around 15 lbs lower than my ultimate dream weight, a weight that I never thought I could achieve. It’s amazing how just giving up one kind of food source could have such an impact on ones health. It’s amazing how much better life is overall now. The arthritis that’s plagued my back for 30 years has reduced in severity to less than half as bad as it was when I was eating them. I’m doing things I haven’t been able to do for more than 30 years. My thinking is clearer. My emotions have evened out from not having the highs and lows from changes in my blood glucose. It’s almost unbelievable how much better I feel…and all from eating no more grains. What a Deal!! And I thought Wheat Belly changed my life. That impact is insignificant compared to what I’ve learned from Grain Brain.

Two weeks later and I’m still losing weight, to the point that I’m at the lowest weight I’ve seen in 30 years. My total weight loss is now over 60 lbs and again I’m being accused of being too skinny. I remember being accused of that in high school. All of this is the result of a high fat, low or no carb diet. I have to admit that it wasn’t easy but it was well worth it and after I broke the addiction of the wheat and grains, the pounds kept melting off effortlessly. And now that I’ve been off of them for 6 months, I can’t go back to eating them, for all the problems that they create, so I”m pretty much guaranteed that I’m not going to put the weight back  on.

This is the really interesting part, according to Dr Perlmutter in his book, Grain Brain, your body creates certain hormones that strengthen and build your brain when you’re thinner and when you fast without food. This seems to be the case for me as it’s much easier to finish my crossword puzzles now. What a deal…weight loss combined with loss of arthritis and a more balanced emotional state and best of all a lot more brain power. I couldn’t have bargained for anything better.

4 months later and my weight seems to have leveled out at 55  pounds lower than it was at my heaviest, 210 lbs. For the last 3 months my weight has been right around 155lbs, which is exactly 10 lbs heavier than when I was 28yrs old. Since adapting a high fat, lo – no carb diet, I can’t seem to put on weight, even though I’m eating more. Maybe it just seems like I’m eating more because I’m eating more often, sometimes 6 times a day. I’m still adjusting to how easy it is to do everything again. Little things like getting up and down have become so easy again, I can either sit on the floor a or stand up from the floor without the use of my hands and if that doesn’t sound like too much, you should try it sometime. It’s something I haven’t been able to do for over 30 years. My arthritis has diminished tremendously to where many of the pains are just nuisance pains. My stomach never gets upset anymore and I don’t seem to get headaches anymore. It’s turned out that this decision to quit eating cereal grains has been the healthiest decision I’ve ever made.

8 months and I bet you’re all waiting to see if I’ve put back on my weight or not. You want to see if this change is permanent or not.  My weight has increased back to 160 lbs, but I’m eating a lot more since I’ve been finding more and more foods to eat that don’t have any grains in them and since my weight is still 15 lbs below what my weight should be for my height, I’m quite happy staying slender. I actually have a “sculpted body” now. I’ve never had a sculpted body. Even when I was 28 and had a somewhat sculpted body, my legs were too skinny because I couldn’t get over 154 lbs in all my attempts to gain weight. It wasn’t until I turned 35 that my weight started to climb. By the time I was 40 it had reached 190 lbs and hit 210 lbs when I turned 53 so needless to say it feels so good to be back down to my normal weight, 160. I just wish I could have had this body when I was 28. The legs may be a little thin yet, but there not skinny.

As far as my other health is concerned, my arthritis has cleared up, I don’t have any stomach problems any more and my thinking is as clear as it’s ever been. This abstinence from grains has taught me that grains truly are dangerous foods for the human body.

It’s now been close to a year since my decision to quit wheat and grains, and with the exception of my lower back where there exists degenerative disc disease, my health hasn’t been better and my weight has stayed at 160 lbs. For my height, that is 15 lbs below my optimum weight, but I’m feeling much better keeping it lower. It’s a lot easier to get up and down now, almost as easy as when I was a kid. From a weight of 210 lbs 7 years ago, to 184 a year ago to 160 now, it’s become apparent that the true key to weight loss was the disappearance of wheat and grains from my diet. It’s also a lot more fun to eat fat again.

Close to 2 years have passed since I originally gave up the grain. I’ve stayed off the grains but my diet has incorporated more fat to compensate for the loss in calories from the high carbohydrate grains. I’ve even taken to taking a sip of coconut oil every once in a while, simply because it tastes good. My weight fluctuates now, between 155 and 160, usually staying closer to 155 most of the time. There are times, however, when I eat too much and when I do that my weight goes up simply because of the amount of food I ate. But then, it always drops back down the next day. It feels so much better being at a weight that I was trying to achieve 35 years ago when I was in my mid-twenties. Back then, I was trying to gain weight, because everybody considered me skinny. After I hit 35, the weight really came on, so much so, that I couldn’t get it back off. Not until I gave up what was keeping that weight on me, the high carbohydrate foods, that are mostly found in grain foods, like bread, cereal, pasta and pastries. High carbohydrate food includes foods with sugar and sweeteners in them, as well, for new studies have shown that diet sodas don’t help anyone keep their weight down. The artificial sweeteners, it seems, trick the body into wanting more, which can be deadly, if you’re already overweight.

I learned that eating fat, doesn’t make you fat. What makes you fat is eating carbs. 

It all has to do with the way your body metabolizes carbs. You can know this by reading Grain Brain by Dr David Perlmutter, or Wheat Belly by Dr William Davis. They’ll both tell you just how devastating this food source can be. And it can be pretty devastating.

After I learned that 1 gram of glucose, (the fuel of carbs) has 4 calories, as opposed to the 9 calories of fuel in each gram of fat, it occurred to me that fat is a much more efficient fuel than the glucose is. That means that you don’t have to eat nearly as much if you’re on a diet that uses healthy fats and protein instead of a diet that uses  high carbohydrate food. Actually you can get all the nutrition out of half of the high fat foods as what you get out of a high carbohydrate food. I’ve been told that the diet I’m on now is actually a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets are usually used for people fighting illness or disease. What I’ve really learned is that Ketogenic diets are for healthy people and anybody who wants to be healthy, because our bodies, genetically, have not advanced enough through evolution to handle the extreme load of glucose that carbs put into the body. I’ve learned that carbs, especially too many of them can be deadly, simply because of  amount of illness and disease they cause, like diabetes, arthritis, cancer, high blood pressure, heart disease, and too many more that room prohibits me from listing them.

Suffice it to say, carbs are bad food to eat. If you switch to a Ketogenic diet and allow your body to go into ketosis, you’ll find that your energy reserves rise dramatically, as well as a return to your previous healthy state when you were younger. For me, it was 40 years younger. You should try it. I can absolutely guarantee that you will like it.

Now, it’s been 28 months since I’ve gone “carb free” and what a trip its been. My weight is still 154 right now. sometimes it fluctuates up to 156 or down to 152, but it’s always in that range, 20+ lbs lower than my prescribed weight. My pain is reduced. The inflammation throughout my entire body is reduced. My headaches are non-existent. I have less mucus in my sinuses. I sweat less because of the lack of fat on my body. My arthritis doesn’t bother me nearly as much. I don’t have stomach problems anymore, ever. Most importantly, I have more energy, a lot more energy and I’m not hungry half the time.  When I am hungry, it’s easy to ignore. This is true bliss. My blood pressure last time I checked it, was 115/60. It’s never been that low. It’s always been in the 130/80 range to 140 /90 range, while at rest. This lack of carbs in my diet has lowered my blood pressure, lowered my blood glucose, balanced my cholesterol, (To those uneducated about cholesterol, I lowered my LDL Cholesterol that’s the bad stuff.) To learn exactly what this transformation has done to my life, visit Carbs, My Life Without Them.

With fat being 225% more efficient than carbs, why would anyone in their right mind ever return to carbs? I love eating fat, to not be fat.

One thing I refuse to do, is to give in to the food/pharmaceutical industrial complex. I will not play their game and fall into their trap, the trap of eating their food, then having to buy their drugs to cure the illness their food causes. My mama didn’t raise a sucker. 

Less than two months later on 3/20/16, my book has been published for two weeks. I have 3 proofs with another 2 on the way. It’s Time For A Cure is available on Amazon.com in color, and Its’ Time To Curb Your Carbs to Save Your Life And Keep Your Dignity and still my weight loss remains permanent.

The effects of carbohydrates on our society throughout history

The effects of carbohydrates on our society throughout history

We owe our civilization to the dawn of agriculture. It was the beginning of agriculture, which started civilization because it  stock-photo-47784218-chicago-aerial-viewtransformed our ancestors into a people who didn’t need to move around to find food. It took us from hunter-gatherers to planters and farmers. They didn’t have to search for food anymore as a new way to acquire it was discovered. Our ancestors discovered how to grow it and this is where the problem of today, started. It started at the same time civilization, as a whole, started over 10,000 years ago. That’s the reason it’s wove, so tightly into our society. As important as it’s been to our society, in the past, it’s that important to curb our use of it in our diet, now. As well as it has served us in the past as a ruins-ancient-civilization-to-day-do-16605664food source, we need to curb its use now because of the dangers this new modern food is doing to our health and emotions.

Never in our entire history, has this food that we’ve been eating for over 10,000 years, been as dangerous as it is today. Don’t
misunderstand me it’s always had the ability to  influence changes in the sugar levels of most mammals. It’s the way our biology works.  It’s this change in glucose levels, that have always given it the ability to influence our behavior. I imagine, some of the very first food fights, were actually for someone else’s food. Could have low blood glucose been at the root of that? More than likely. What food effects glucose levels in the blood, so much? Which food has one of the largest amounts of carbohydrates, empty carbohydrates in it?
golden-wheat-field-100275752

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The food source that I’m referring to here is, you guessed it, wheat. It was one of the founding crops that we grew, and it’s helped develop our civilizations, throughout history. It’s also helped to destroy civilizations throughout history. And the way it did it, was due to the same quality of this food that makes it so dangerous today. That is, its ability to fluctuate blood glucose levels, in all who ingest it. This is what turns on the fat faucet. That’s why cattle ranchers use grains, to fatten their herds. Grains, in general, are fattening foods. It was important in ancient times to eat fattening foods. We needed the fat to tie us over in times when food was scarce. Now, food isn’t scarce. It’s not even hard to get. As a matter of fact, this kind of food has become far too easy to get and that’s where the danger lies. This food is far too available. Food like this was never this available in the quantities we eat them, for our ancestors. They had to work to either find their food, or grow their food. It just didn’t come to them as easy as we are able to get our hands on it, today. Because of this, the bodies that used to have to exercise to get their food don’t have to today. But that only presents one of two reasons. There’re actually a couple of reasons why, that what’s sustained us throughout history, is killing us today. This food that’s so woven into our culture(s) that’s sustained us for so long,  is killing us today, And it’s killing us slowing and expensively.

The main reason is because it’s a carbohydrate. It’s a starchy high carbohydrate food that changes blood glucose levels more rapidly than any other type of food. That’s what’s always made it so  wheat-bread-wheat-shock-white-background-34095411palatable. That’s what’s always made it addictive also. It’s just more addictive now due to its genetic engineering, The problem that it’s a carb, has been with us since wheat’s inception. The other problem, the one you can blame on genetic engineering, has made it a product, now, that’s super high in starchy non-nutritious carbs with hardly any nutritional content. What nutrients it has are not worth the trade-off for the massive amount of carbohydrates you get when you eat this food. But the fact that it’s a carbohydrate in the first place, is at the root of the problem. The problem is that glucose (carbohydrates) are digested on a cellular level, with the hormone insulin. This turns the glucose into fat so it can enter the cell, to be used as a fuel. It’s here, that the problem begins. The fat, that the insulin turns glucose into, is not that good of a fat.  (Especially at the rate we’re consuming these carbs, now.)  It is fat your body would rather store than use right away. This primitive digestive behavior is coupling itself with today’s sedentary lifestyles, to produce disastrous results.

Those results are what are costing us millions of lives, dollars, hours in lost production, our mental focus and emotional senses. All this is due to the way this food controls our blood sugars. When eaten by humans, they’re subject to the fluctuations of their blood glucose, due to the glucose infusion in the blood stream from the carbohydrates, setting off the cry for insulin. But we’re not going to talk about insulin, because its part of the story doesn’t come back in, until you start looking at what this food has the ability to do to you. This is the reason for all the illness and diseases it’s causing today. If you doubt this, read my first blog.

What we’re going to look at is the change in blood glucose in the body and what influences it has on one’s moods, emotions, thoughts, actions and speech as well as physical health. We’re going to do this because the food we’ve been ingesting throughout our entire lifetime, as a species, is the same food we’re eating right now, when in all actuality, it’s not. The food we’re eating now, that resembles this staple of our diet for so many years, isn’t anything like that of what we ate then. Today’s version of this staple is much higher in fat causing carbohydrates. It’s this one little factor about its existence that sets it aside from all other foods. The simple fact, because it has the ability to change your blood glucose so much, it has the ability to change your moods and emotional patterns, as well as behavioral patterns. Who knows what influence this factor has had throughout history? I can see today, how those patterns have been amplified. They’ve been amplified, because the food that causes this behavior has been amplified in the amount of carbohydrates it provides, to those who eat it. Their glucose levels are always varying by wide margins which in turn makes their moods vary by wide margins also. This variance in range of emotions, is what I contend, is a major influence in worldwide behavior today.

I wonder what it would be like if everyone were on a low carb diet and were no longer subject to the glucose changes in the blood and thereby not subject to changes in their moods and emotional behavior. Would everyone think and behave more rationally? They wouldn’t be influenced by the mood swings as much. I contend that they would. I know I have since I’ve been on a low carb diet. It’s done so much to alter my emotional behavior that it’s made me a completely new person. I’m not nearly as volatile as I used to be. I don’t lose my temper like I used to. Most importantly, I don’t get frustrated as much as I used to. Simply put, I’m a much saner guy, than what I used to be on  carbohydrate diet. I think much more rationally, now that I’m on a low carb(MCT keto) diet. If this diet can do this for me, can you imagine what it can do for anyone else? I try to imagine what it could do for the world and how it might help to mellow everyone out, just a little bit. It would, at least, make everyone healthier and that change alone might go a long way to evening our emotions.

My contention is that if can do it for anybody in the world and if it can, why can’t that change the behavior of the world?

Only abstinence from this food, can tell us if it would work. I ask you, why not try to find out if I’m correct in my assumptions? What do we have to lose? Bad Health? Lost production? Lost wealth? Lost sanity? To me the trade off is worth the gamble, wouldn’t you think so?